Sonny and Cher on Noah’s Ark with Two Pythons

But a narrative takes its own direction, and continues on, almost automatically.  And whether he liked it or not, Tengo was a part of that world.  To him, this was no longer a fictional world.  This was the real world, where red blood spurts out when you slice open your skin with a knife.  And in the sky in this world, there were two moons, side by side.

Fantasy? Science Fiction? Mystery? Romance? Something just plain weird?  All of the above? Probably.

A ten-year old girl takes the hand of a boy in her grade school class without saying a word – then lets it go.  Soon after, she disappears from the boy’s life.  Twenty years later, both still have the moment seared into their psyche.  Strange and unusual circumstances begin to bring Tengo and Aomame together, but something also seems to want to keep them apart.

Haruki Murakami’s novel 1Q84 reminded me of the television show Lost.  Numerous little pieces of a large story get intertwined to keep you guessing and wondering how the story will finally wrap up.  Murakami makes several “nods” to Charles Dickens in this novel.  I had read somewhere a while ago that the Lost creators were huge fans of Dickens.  I have a feeling that Murakami might also be a Dickens fan.  Murakami skillfully includes minute details in his story that end up being important later on, similar to both Lost and Dickens. Murakami also makes several references to Anton Chekhov, a writer I’m not as familiar with but want to be.

Throughout the novel, the reader is never sure what is actually real and what is not.  Are the characters in this world or another world?  Murakami’s writing can take on a beautiful dream-like quality that enhances this question.  Unlike the TV show Lost, I was fairly certain how the novel would end.  And also, unlike Lost, I was right.  I think it’s the sign of a great writer when a reader can tell which way a story is going to end and still be wow-ed by the ending.  Surprise is sometimes overrated.

However, I just couldn’t shake one question about the novel.  Somewhere in the middle, Tengo describes some sort of vision/daydream that involves Sonny and Cher on Noah’s Ark with two pythons.  This was one of those minute details that just didn’t seem to have any significance other than to make me wonder – which perhaps is significant.  Oh well..the beat goes on…

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8 responses to “Sonny and Cher on Noah’s Ark with Two Pythons

  1. Aha…FINALLY an author I’ve read before you…Chekhov. I guess my drama background had to have some use sometime! I remember liking “The Cherry Orchard”.

  2. Hi Dale,
    I’d forgotten the whole Sonny & Cher passage in this book (in a book of a thousand pages, one can’t remember everything!). I invent back and reviewed, bit can’t guess what its significance might be.

    I just recently finished reading an older, more conventional Murakami novel called “Norwegian Wood.” My appetite for more only got worse…
    -Jay

      • I hope to eventually write about it. It’s one of those where finding a way to write without mega-spoilersis difficult. I did do a couple sentence review on my goodreads.com page. Are you on Goodreads?

      • I signed up on Goodreads through facebook a while ago and had nothing but problems. I think I did sign up”outside” of facebook but then forgot my password, etc. And I could never get it to sync up with my facebook account. I may have to just start over!

  3. Pingback: Top Ten Tuesday: Favorite Books Read During The Lifespan of My Blog | Mirror w/ Clouds

  4. Pingback: Haruki Murakami: Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman | Mirror w/ Clouds

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